Why I Will Likely Choose to Homeschool

Why I Will Likely Choose to Homeschool

Earlier this year (before coronavirus and social distancing) I took my sons to the park on an unusually warm day. It had just rained, and there were puddles all over the sidewalks. My oldest son Mason ran to a puddle and proceeded to jump and splash around. I saw his shoes and jeans getting soaked, and my first impulse was to pull him away and redirect him to a less messy activity. But I squashed that impulse, thinking isn’t this exactly the kind of thing kids are supposed to do? As I let him have his muddy puddle day, I noticed other moms walking by, tightly gripping their children’s hands and firmly telling them that there would be no puddle jumping that day. While I don’t judge those moms (I know realistically that every day can’t be a muddy puddle day) I have this lingering sense that we’ve lost some of the magic of childhood. I feel like our society is so obsessed with comparison, and meeting milestones and achievement now, that we put a lot of pressure on children rather than letting them develop naturally and at their own pace. That also creates a lot of pressure for parents, and may give children less opportunity to explore their environment and interests. 

My disenchantment extends to education. Let me preface this by saying that I know there are many great public and private schools around the country. Educators have some of the most important and undervalued jobs in our society. I also come from a family of educators and people who work within the public school system. My mom is a licensed school counselor and former counseling director, and my stepdad is a superintendent for a city in Hampton Roads. They feel passionate about public schools and work to make them better. But I have some concerns about whether or not public school will be the best fit for my boys, and the more research that I do the more I think it may not be a good fit. And now that so many people are being forced to consider their options because of the pandemic, homeschooling has suddenly been thrust into the spotlight. 

Here are my concerns with traditional schooling and why I think homeschool may be a better fit for my family: 

  • I’m not a fan of the grading system as a whole. I think grades are one of many ways in which kids are separated into groups of good and bad. We give opportunities to high achieving students and make low achieving students feel as if they are deserving of less, and sometimes this is done without diagnosing why students aren’t performing well. It’s also unfortunately true that African American boys are more likely to be mislabeled as bad because of cultural differences and educator biases. And as someone with three black boys, that’s not something that I take lightly. With homeschooling, I can ensure that their learning environment is highly supportive and collaborative, and that it fosters confidence. I can work with them on their weaker subject areas and push them in their areas of strength without the reward/punishment system that grading creates. 

 

  • Teachers in a traditional classroom aren’t given enough time or freedom to teach in a way that works with every student’s individual learning style. I believe Mason and Myles have a visual learning style. Mason also has some sensory processing issues and gets overstimulated very easily. I can already foresee that a traditional classroom environment may be challenging for him. If I homeschool my children, I can create a low stimulation environment that focuses on their individual learning styles. I can also have the freedom to include subjects that I believe should be on a standard curriculum, and include whatever supplemental materials, outside activities, and field trips that I want to include. Homeschooling is not bound to a set schedule or confined to the walls of a traditional classroom.

 

  • And my final concern is that our reliance on checklists and standardized testing sometimes forces students to move on before they’ve really mastered a subject. With homeschooling I can take my time if the kids struggle in any area before moving on, to build a stronger foundation. Kids are allowed more freedom to grasp ideas without the pressure of standardized testing. 

 

That being said, I know there are many benefits to traditional schooling and what’s best for your family will vary by the individual. Of course homeschooling isn’t a solution for everyone. For some it may not seem financially feasible or work with their schedules. Many people do not want to be at home with their kids all day and that’s okay too. And many value the social and academic structure of a traditional school. However I know there are also many people who have an interest in homeschooling but find the idea of it daunting. The number one concern that most people seem to have is that their children won’t get enough social interaction if they are homeschooled. Many homeschool families participate in local homeschool groups and co-ops, use group tutors, place their children in sports and extracurricular activities, attend church etc. We plan to supplement their education with these types of activities outside of the home, and encourage group collaboration within our home. 

Another big concern seems to be parents feeling like they’re not up to the task of teaching all day and providing all of the support that a child needs. One important point to note is that homeschooling does not require teaching for eight hours a day, and for younger kids it shouldn’t span more than a few hours. Parents also have the freedom to be as involved in the curriculum as they want. You can create your own, go with a very structured curriculum that requires little planning, or combine things that you like from different curriculums. Parents can also use tutors or co-ops for difficult subjects, and seek outside resources and referrals for help with developmental issues. 

If you’re interested in homeschooling or having some additional resources to supplement distance learning for the upcoming school year, there are a lot of great curriculums out there to consider. I already have a few favorites, and I’m looking for more. These are made by Christian companies, but if you’re not interested in that I think it’s possible to tailor them into a more secular curriculum. I’ve heard great things about Masterbooks. I’m also very intrigued by The Good and the Beautiful (a very structured curriculum that makes homeschooling multiple children easier by teaching two subjects family style) and Gather Round (which focuses on unit studies and teaches all subjects family style except math). I also highly recommend the book The Brave Learner; it’s a great resource for parents who want to lean into their children’s education and enhance some of the magic of childhood.

How do you feel about homeschooling? If you have school aged children, what are your plans for the upcoming school year? Let me know your thoughts.

 

Xo,

Courtney

 

Thoughts on 50/50 Parenting

Thoughts on 50/50 Parenting

I recently started working on a blog post about how my husband and I split up our responsibilities and decided to delay it a bit to write about this theme for Father’s day. For those of you who are new to my blog, I like to challenge misconceptions about millennial motherhood. You can read one of my early blog posts where I covered a range of common misconceptions here. For this father’s day themed post I wanted to address what I believe is a common misconception about millennial dads (and maybe modern fatherhood in general). And if you’re new to my blog, here’s some background on my family: My husband Nosa and I met in college (almost 10 years ago- where does the time go??) but we got married in 2016 and have three beautiful boys ages 3, 2, and 8 months. Yes, we have our hands full. But our children are also the light of our lives. The past year has been a whirlwind. Three under three was no joke, especially with a colicky baby. Thankfully we are now at a stage where all three boys have a consistent naptime, a consistent bedtime, and sleep through the night. And our youngest Maxwell is crawling, being extremely vocal, and playing (aka fighting over toys) with his brothers already. Nosa always jokes that Maxwell is his favorite; he really completes our family. This period of our lives has been really intense, but we’re constantly learning and growing as a result. 

Sometimes well-meaning people ask me how Nosa is doing with a kind of pitying tone, and this always leaves me confused. He’s been sleeping through the night much longer than I have; he’s doing fine. Not that I want to make light of his experience, because being a parent is really hard. He’s had plenty of stress and frustration just like I have. But while I appreciate their concern for him, I think on some level it stems from the fact that many people expect men to be the weaker parent and inherently less capable when it comes to handling everything. I honestly find that a bit problematic and that’s the misconception I want to address. I don’t baby my husband. Am I better at packing a diaper bag, preparing meals, and scheduling appointments? Yes. But he’s better at entertaining the kids, shifting the energy in the room when I’m frustrated, and teaching them new things. We were both co-creators of our family, and my expectations for a 50/50 partner demand that he step up every day just like I do. 

I’m not trying to sound sanctimonious about my expectations, but I believe a lot of men are becoming increasingly involved and capable in their children’s lives and we should expect nothing less. And when a family grows at any stage we should assume both partners are equally involved and share similar feelings about that growth unless we’re told otherwise.

That’s how I feel in theory, but how does expecting a 50/50 partner look in practice (especially with me being a stay at home parent)? Well, I’ve had to let go of some things- I’m the kind of person who likes to take on a lot in order to ensure that things are done the way I like them. But that can be exhausting, especially since I’m with the kids 24/7. I’ve learned that his way of doing things usually works too, I just have to give him the opportunity to handle things on his own. This is very important when I need a break, and something I’m still working on. 

We’ve also had to make some adjustments to our schedule. Because I’m a stay at home mom, childcare is my job during the day. But mornings, evenings, and weekends are times that we divide responsibilities evenly. We both like to work out in the mornings sometimes, but if it’s his day he knows to be back in time to help me get our boys up and ready. And if it’s my day he’s on childcare duty. He always feeds and takes care of Maxwell while I prepare breakfast for my toddlers. After work he watches them while I take a break if I need it, and while I make dinner. Otherwise we usually parent together outside of work hours until our kids’ bedtime. I prepare the meals because I’m the better chef, but he usually does the dishes, etc etc. Our schedule can be hectic and intense but we reward ourselves with quality time after the kids go to bed. Is our system perfect? Of course not. There’s always room for improvement. But it’s always evolving to meet our needs and expectations. And I always give feedback when I feel like I need more support. 

Do you agree that the idea that men are less capable/enthusiastic parents is a common misconception? If you have a partner, how do you divide up responsibilities in your household? Do you embrace or reject traditional gender roles? Let me know your thoughts.

 

Xo,

Courtney

How to Avoid Mom Burnout

How to Avoid Mom Burnout

How are you holding up? I know the past couple of months have been tough for everyone. I’m grateful that my family is healthy and together at home (and also grateful that my baby Maxwell is finally sleeping through the night so I can feel like a real human being again) but of course spending so much time with two toddlers and an infant without a real break can be challenging at times. Burnout is a serious problem for parents everywhere.  Here are my top tips to fight back against burnout:

Take a walk or do a daily workout (preferably without your kids)– If you have the option to take a morning or evening walk/jog without your children present, this is a great peaceful activity to clear your mind and get some fresh air. In the past whenever I’ve done this I’ve always come back feeling much better. If you can’t get out by yourself, taking a walk with your children is still much better than staying indoors all the time. Sometimes our thoughts feel heavier when they’re trapped inside the walls of our homes, and getting outdoors can shift our perspectives. 

Working out indoors is also a useful way to boost your mood with endorphins. I recently started doing 2-3 short workouts a day using the Peloton app. I do a dance routine in the mornings when Maxwell is napping. My toddlers love the music and try to copy the dance routine so it’s a fun activity for everyone. Sometimes in the evenings we do one of Peloton’s 5 minute family cardio videos to get our blood moving, and after Maxwell has gone to bed my husband takes our toddlers downstairs to play and I do a cycling workout right before I start their bedtime routine. Scheduling that time for myself every day is a method of self-care that actually leaves me feeling recharged. There are a lot of great fitness apps to use for indoor workouts, or you can keep it simple with workouts like push ups, sit ups, pullups, squats, planks, and jump roping that are all very effective. 

Talk or video chat every day– One of the hardest parts of quarantine life for many of us is not being able to see family and friends like we used to. But reaching out for some light hearted conversation with other adults who are not a part of your household is a useful tool to avoid mom burnout. And checking on loved ones can be calming and reassuring. Make time to call or text friends or family every day.  I’m usually not a big fan of video chatting, but it’s been vital in staying connected to my mom and sister. I love the Facebook portal, my kids enjoy using all of the funny filters while they video chat with their Nana. 

Watch things that help you escape– There are so many great shows and movies on Netflix and other streaming platforms. Watching something that helps you escape from your own life for a little bit is a useful indulgence when things feel monotonous or you need a pick me up. I usually love action movies and dramas, but comedies and romance have been especially entertaining to me lately. Don’t feel bad for indulging in more screen time when you need it. 

Practice self care– In addition to restarting my fitness journey, I also started a new skincare routine recently. These small acts of self-care remind me that I need to make myself a priority in my household too. And my kids and I get dressed (almost) every day. I used to let them hang out in their pajamas all day pretty often, but now that the days are all running together I feel like getting dressed gives us a little more structure to start the day. Whatever makes you feel calmer, more productive, or more confident should be a part of your daily routine. 

Stick to a schedule– Sticking to a clear weekday schedule is one of the most useful tools that I have to combat burnout. Structure makes me feel like our ship is still sailing somewhat smoothly. I still use The Busy Toddler’s Playing Preschool lesson plans on weekdays. Thankfully my boys are still young enough to have a dedicated nap time so I use that time to take a break when I can. And we stick to a bedtime for all three kids. 

Those are my top tips to combat mom burnout. If you have any tips please share them in the comments!


Xo,

Courtney


My Must Have Clothing Items for Boys

My Must Have Clothing Items for Boys

As a mom of 3 boys, I jokingly refer to myself as a VIP member of the boy mom club. One thing I’ve noticed (and have mentioned here before) is that boy moms have far less options when it comes to finding cute clothing for our sons. Over the past few years I’ve gotten a lot of items from a handful of brands that I think consistently make cute options for boys (you can read more about them in my blog post here) but there are some items that have really stood out to me. These are the things that I find myself rebuying in new sizes and colors every year because they’re such a staple in my children’s wardrobes. If you don’t have boys, some of these items also make great gifts. Here are my faves, click the title of each item to shop:

Gap’s Icon Denim Jacket

It doesn’t get much more classic than a denim jacket. I love The Gap for baby and children’s clothing because the quality is excellent and they always make cute items for boys. Every time Mason outgrows his Icon jacket I get a new one and pass down the old one to Myles. They’re all in such great shape I’ll be passing them down to Maxwell as well. This jacket is definitely a staple from spring through the fall. You can add it to a pair of sweatpants and a tshirt for a more put together casual look, or put it on top of a button down shirt and a pair of pants. 

Gap’s Fleece Cargo Pants

These are my favorite casual pants for the boys. They’re super soft, have held up well through lots of washing, and have the ease of a sweatpant with a slightly elevated cool factor. I have these in 3 colors for both of my toddlers. They frequently sell out, but there are a few sizes left right now and they’re on sale. 

Oshkosh Overalls– 

Overalls from Oshkosh B’gosh are classic, cute and nostalgic. They make me think of my own childhood. Even though its a relatively simple item, my boys get a lot of compliments when wearing them. The quality is also high enough to pass down. 

Gap Slim Cords in Camel

These camel corduroys are a staple in the fall and winter. They work with a wide variety of tops and the slim design is a more modern spin on a classic corduroy.

Gap Chambray Slip On Sneakers

This is another item that I try to buy every time Mason outgrows them, but they’re so popular that they sell out very quickly in the Spring and Summer. It’s definitely best to grab these early if you can. This simple Chambray sneaker looks good with just about everything, and is so easy to slip on and off. 

Ralph Lauren Polos

There is something about a polo that looks so preppy, polished and adorable on little boys. I love the quality of these, and if you shop Ralph Lauren’s end of season sales you can get them at a steep discount (often less than $10). 

Gap Baby Brannan Sweaters

Gap makes these adorable sweaters with animal ears in neutral colors and cute prints for both boys and girls. Every sweater that I have purchased has held up well over time, so they’re another great item for gifting and for passing down to siblings. 

Zara Puffer Coats

Zara is one of my favorite places to purchase outerwear for the boys. Their winter coats are warm and stylish. They also tend to run a little big so your child has room to grow. 

Carters Sleep N Plays

My boys have spent practically every day in these popular one pieces from birth to nine months. They’re affordable and come in a variety of really cute prints for boys. Carters even makes a two way zipper version now that makes diaper changes easier. 

Those are the items that have been on repeat the most in my boys’ wardrobes, and that I continuously buy because they’re so useful. If you have any boys items that you love, or stores that you recommend, let me know in the comments!

Xo,

Courtney 

 

How to Survive the Fourth Trimester

How to Survive the Fourth Trimester

I’m currently six weeks into my fourth trimester- the magical three month period after having a new baby when you’re recovering from childbirth and caring for a new human that’s still on womb central time. This is baby #3 but I’m still finding the fourth trimester to be a challenge at times. This time around I have the benefit of experience with juggling more than one baby, but still suffer from sleep deprivation and hormonal changes (among other things)  just like any new mom. I feel so blessed to have my three boys, but going through the postpartum period three years in a row hasn’t been an easy task and I’ve learned a lot (and I’m still learning) as a result. Here are my top tips for surviving the fourth trimester:

Manage Your Expectations– Having a new baby can be a wonderful experience at times, and at other times you might feel caught off guard by how challenging things like sleep deprivation, breastfeeding, or caring for a fussy baby can be. It’s important to know that these experiences are normal and temporary, and seek support if you’re struggling with anything. Lean on family and friends for advice when you need it.

If your hospital or another resource in your community offers a new mom support group consider joining.  Read books about the postpartum period. Join POSITIVE and ENCOURAGING mom groups online. I personally love reading updates from Lucie’s List and I read and post to a few mom groups on Facebook. You can never have too much support during this period. Hearing from others about what’s normal helps you manage your expectations when things feel tough.

Many times hormonal changes and sleep deprivation are the main culprits when new moms feel irritable or “off” but if you feel like things are more serious than that and you may be suffering from postpartum depression then don’t be afraid to seek help. Many women experience that too and your pediatrician or OB can get you started with resources that will help.

Prioritize Your Needs– People tend to prioritize the baby’s needs (this starts from day 1 in the hospital) but your needs are important too. The saying that you can’t pour from an empty cup definitely applies here. Ask for as much help as you want. Say no to any activities or visitors that feel draining.

Even simple activities like taking a shower and drinking a cup of coffee can be important rituals for a new mom. Invest in a bouncer or swing if you can so that you can put that cute baby down and take care of yourself when you’re on your own. The baby will be okay while you take a quick shower.

Also don’t neglect your nutrition, especially if you’re nursing. A healthy, balanced diet and lots of water are necessary to replenish your body after childbirth. You have to be the one in charge of your self-care.

Get As Much Sleep As You Can– Unless you’re blessed with a baby who’s a great sleeper from the start (it happens, I got that lucky with baby #2) this one is usually easier said than done. But getting more sleep usually starts with getting help at night if you can. Make your partner take a shift at night if possible. Even if you’re not going into work like your partner, you still have the important job of caring for a baby during the day.

They say sleep when the baby sleeps during the day, but it can be tough to choose between napping, getting work done, and just enjoying some time to yourself. And if you have more than one child then this is especially difficult. But if sleeping is an option, take it. Cleaning, cooking, your Instagram feed etc all can wait.

Get Out of the House– Sometimes when things feel tough or you’re just exhausted, you need a change of scenery. Taking the baby for a walk so that you can get some fresh air can lift your mood. Try to schedule a few fun activities out of the house with your partner or friends as well, but don’t overwhelm yourself.

The fourth trimester might feel never ending during the challenging moments, but before you know it your baby will have outgrown the newborn stage. There’s nothing like those sweet newborn snuggles, so remember to pause and soak in the sweetness whenever you can. Those are my top tips for surviving the fourth trimester. I’d love to hear your thoughts/advice in the comments!

Xo,

Courtney

What I Learned About Motherhood from my Own Mom

What I Learned About Motherhood from my Own Mom

This past weekend I enjoyed a visit from my mom and sister. I love spending time with those two, they’re a big part of my life even when we’re physically separated (they live in Hampton Roads) and I turn to them for laughs and advice daily. Spending time with them as my household continues to prep for baby #3 led me to reflect on my own childhood. My mom had me when she was just a teenager, and went on to accomplish so much. I’m even more impressed by her sacrifices now that I’m a mother myself. One of the biggest lessons that I learned from my mom was that we as women are always capable of more than we think.

I know that things weren’t easy for my mom. Her version of parenthood included being a teenage mother and a single mother while working to support me and my sister, eventually earning a Bachelors and a Masters degree, and building a career. Once during grad school she became so stressed by everything she was juggling that she started experiencing physical symptoms that had to be treated with medication. But no matter what she always pushed on and made things look more effortless than they were. She didn’t let anything stop her from accomplishing her dreams AND being a good parent. Her level of achievement despite the previous obstacles in her life makes me feel like anything I want is achievable with time and persistence.

Her positive attitude about life is a big part of why I usually try to be positive (online and in real life) about motherhood. Of course I have days where I’m feeling exhausted or stressed out and overwhelmed. Parenting will do that to anyone, especially when you have small children back to back. Just adulting in general can be overwhelming some days. And being real about that can be cathartic. BUT I’ve learned from my mom that you choose how you react to your stress. Wallowing in negativity doesn’t change anything. You still have to put on your big girl pants and get things done regardless. As women we do this every day in one way or another. We always keep pushing even when things are hard.
Coming from a place of positivity instead usually involves feeling or expressing gratitude, which makes any situation better. So on the days when I’m exhausted and everyone in my household is driving me crazy, I try to remember to be grateful for them and that I wouldn’t change a single thing about my family. I keep pushing on when things are tough because I know that I’m capable of getting things done.
Another thing that I learned from my mom is that you can make positive memories for your children that will outlast many of the harder memories, and that you don’t need a big budget to do so. Things like going to the beach, getting ice cream in the summer, and carving pumpkins still stand out in my memory. Those memories make me want to treat my boys to positive experiences, so I try to schedule fun things on the weekends like play space time, farm trips, days at some of our favorite DMV locations like Old Town Alexandria or National Harbor etc. And I’m always looking for more fun things to do if you have any suggestions.

My mom also encouraged me to pursue different hobbies and interests like sports (although that didn’t last long for me) and playing the violin (which did last from elementary through most of high school). I can’t wait until my boys are old enough to join teams or develop their own hobbies. I could go on and on about what I’ve learned about parenting from my mom, but I’d love to hear from you. What are some of the biggest lessons your parents taught you?
Xo,
Courtney

What’s In My Hospital Bag- Round Three

What’s In My Hospital Bag- Round Three

I’m nearing the end of my pregnancy (my due date is next month!) and I have my hospital bag packed early this time. During my second pregnancy I also packed early and it turned out to be a smart move because I spontaneously went into labor at 36 weeks. Now that I know what to expect, I’ve narrowed my hospital bag list to some essentials and a few comfort/splurge items (because at this point I feel like I deserve it). Hopefully this list helps another expecting/future mom out there, but if you’ve already gone through labor and delivery I’d love to hear about what you packed. A lot of these items can be ordered and delivered to you within a couple of days on Amazon. I think the most important thing to remember though is that the hospital will provide most of what you really need. Here is everything currently in my hospital bag:

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Kindred Bravely French Terry Racerback Nursing BrasI know I raved about Everlane’s tank bra in my previous post about my favorite maternity items, but I’ve been meaning to post an update. They were a God-send, pretty much until I hit third trimester. As my breasts continued to increase in size (and I haven’t even started breastfeeding yet) I started to experience spillage with the Everlane bras. They just aren’t big enough to accommodate my pregnancy/breastfeeding size, but I’m hoping to get some use out of them later after I’m done breastfeeding. While looking for an alternative, I came across the Kindred Bravely nursing bras and decided to give them a try. These bras are amazing! Not only are they incredibly soft but they’re also supportive. Even with pesky pregnancy hormones they don’t irritate me at all. I don’t experience any spillage and the straps always stay in place because of the racerback style. The Kindred Bravely website has a really helpful guide for choosing the right size. Just fyi, this particular style is meant for sleep/loungewear, so there’s no padding. I have two packed in my bag.

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Emma + Ollie Postpartum Belly WrapThis will be my first time using a belly wrap after pregnancy, but I’ve heard good things from friends about how the right wrap or girdle can offer support as your stomach (and other organs) settle back into place. I found this affordable option on Amazon and I’m looking forward to trying it out. 

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Motherhood Maternity Long Sleeve V-Neck Ruched TeeI packed a maternity top and leggings for my going home outfit. Unfortunately a pregnant stomach does not go back down immediately after delivery (I usually look like I’m still several months pregnant) so maternity items will ensure that I’m comfortable when I leave. Motherhood Maternity’s ruched t-shirts are a great basic to have in your pregnancy wardrobe. They’re flattering and can work with a variety of looks. 

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Zella Mamasana Live In Maternity Ankle LeggingsI love these leggings because they suck in everything below the belly and they’re still comfortable because of the over-the-belly panel. I picked them up during the Nordstrom Anniversary sale and have kept them in heavy rotation. I’m sure they will offer great support when I leave the hospital. 

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Stars Above Soft Notch Collar NightgownYou should pack at least a couple of pairs of comfy pajamas that allow for easy breastfeeding. I love these pajama dresses from Target because they’re comfortable, nice enough to wear in front of guests if you want, and the neckline unbuttons easily for breastfeeding. 

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Barefoot Dreams Cozychic Socks, Lite Ribbed Robe, and Lite Circle CardiganI’m a huge fan of everything Barefoot Dreams makes. A couple of these items were splurges for me, but I really think this Oprah endorsed brand is amazing. The cardigan and robe are so incredibly soft and cozy and give me all the fall feels. It’s a good idea to pack a robe and slippers or cozy socks in case you want to walk around the hospital while you’re dressed in your delivery gown or to feel a little cozier in your room. 

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BabyBliss Reusable Bamboo Nursing PadsIt takes a few days for your milk to come in after birth, but before that you’ll produce colostrum (an important source of nutrients) for your baby. If you’ve already had a baby before the milk may come in faster. Once it does come in you will need nursing pads to absorb leaking milk in your bra. I’ve used disposable nursing pads in the past but prefer the reusable kind that I can just throw in the washing machine. This saves money and I think they’re more comfortable. 

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Frida Mom Upside Down Peri BottleIf you haven’t experienced childbirth yet I don’t want to gross you out, but things get very messy and if you have a vaginal birth you will be sore and may even need some stitches. The hospital provides all sorts of things to help you recover like ice packs, witch hazel, pads, and a plastic peri bottle to rinse yourself off every time you use the restroom (and they’ll send you home with a ton of extra supplies). A lot of women aren’t huge fans of the standard issue peri bottle though, and Frida Mom (the makers of the amazing Frida Baby products) came out with an upside down version that is supposed to be so much easier to use. A friend recently introduced me to the Frida Mom line and I can’t wait to try this. 

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Frida Mom Disposable Postpartum UnderwearAnd because things get messy after birth (think an extremely heavy version of your period) the hospital will provide disposable mesh underwear to wear with giant pads. Some women don’t like them but I actually think they’re pretty comfortable. The only problem is I always run out of them and then resort to using inexpensive Hanes briefs until the bleeding slows down (but there’s nothing wrong with using regular, comfortable underwear that you don’t mind ruining if you want). This time I plan to keep the stretchy comfort going a little longer with Frida Mom’s disposable underwear. They also make a variety of other postpartum products that I may order once I run out of my stockpile from the hospital. 

Headbands and hair ties- I’ll probably stick to simple buns while I’m in the hospital so I packed a few hair supply essentials. 

Toiletries- I also packed the essentials like a toothbrush, deodorant, etc. The hospital will also provide some basic toiletries but you may prefer to have your own. Some women like to bring their own towels for comfort too but I always leave mine at home. 

Makeup- If you like to wear makeup it’s a good idea to bring some along for pictures and/or visits with family and friends. Putting on a little makeup always makes me feel more put together after birth.

Electronics and entertainment – I packed a phone charger, and if you have an Ipad you may want to download a few of your favorite shows or movies on that, or bring a book or two for entertainment. 

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Boppy Nursing PillowBoppies make certain breastfeeding positions more comfortable by providing extra support as you hold the baby. I used mine often the last time I was in the hospital, and they make great infant loungers later on. 

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Aden + Anais Stroller BlanketThe hospital will provide everything you need for the baby while you’re there, including clothing, diapers, pacifiers, and blankets for swaddling (and let you take a lot home). But you may want to bring something personal to drape over the baby in the car seat when you leave. I like Aden + Anais because they make high-quality muslin products and muslin fabric is breathable and therefore gives me peace of mind. 

Going home outfit for baby- You’ll also need an outfit for the baby when you leave, although you can usually dress the baby in clothing you brought the entire time if you want. I usually pack 1-2 going home outfits. 

That’s everything in my hospital bag! I’d love some feedback, is there anything I missed? If you’ve gone through labor and delivery in a hospital what items were you glad you packed and what do you wish you had left at home?

 

Xo,

Courtney

The Routines That Keep My Household Afloat

The Routines That Keep My Household Afloat

Now that I’ve been a Mom of two for over a year (and am getting closer and closer to being a Mom of three!) I’ve realized the key to success in my household is creating routines and sticking to them, and how routines might help others even if you’re a parent (or future parent) of one. My household does the best when we stick to established routines, and when we stray from them for too long chaos usually ensues! Below I’ve listed some of the routines that I use to keep my sanity on weekdays, including the kids’ daily routines, my weekday mealtime routine, and most importantly our bedtime routine (is there anything parents want more than more sleep?) 

The Kids’ Daytime Schedule

We typically follow the same schedule Monday through Friday. When the kids wake up I let them play for about half an hour, make breakfast, then let them watch cartoons while I do some laundry or cleaning (yes, I am pro screen time when I need a distraction).

After that we do an at home preschool program by Susie of the Busy Toddler. It’s meant for kids ages 2.5 and up, but my youngest Myles still participates sometimes. The lessons typically involve a song or two, a book, and 2-3 hands on activities. I get most of the suggested books from the library, and the rest of the books and supplies on Amazon.

After “preschool” and more play time I make lunch and put the boys down for a nap. It took a little while to get both of them on the same nap schedule. This involved doing my best to keep Myles awake until after lunch, until he got used to it. Getting them down for a nap at the same time is so worth it, because it guarantees me an hour or two of free time where I can get some things done or take a nap myself (which has been helpful this pregnancy). If you have two children close in age I recommend getting them on the same nap schedule as early as possible. 

After nap time I take them out in the stroller for a walk or some time at the park or library. Then I just let them play until my husband comes home and he takes over while I make dinner. The rest of the evening typically revolves around whatever my husband and I are doing.

Mealtimes

I love to eat but I am not the type of person who loves to cook. I’ve developed a few hacks to make things easier for myself. The first thing I do to make things easier is never taking my kids grocery shopping. I rarely go to the grocery store at all these days, unless I’m running in for a quick item or two. The rest of the time I order groceries through Amazon Prime Now. They are conveniently delivered to my door and as long as you buy at least $35 worth of groceries the delivery fee is free (although you can add on an optional tip for the driver). This means no more struggling with a crying toddler or two while I schlep down aisle after aisle, and grocery shopping no longer raises my blood pressure like it has in the past. 

For breakfast I usually alternate between whole wheat pancakes, Abe’s amazing vegan muffins (I cannot stress enough how amazing they are), cinnamon raisin toast, or scrambled eggs with fresh fruit for my kids. In the future I’d love to expand to some more healthy recipes but for now these options are quick and always work.

Lunch is usually peanut butter and jelly sandwiches or Dr. Praegar’s spinach, broccoli, sweet potato or kale littles with veggies or fruit. I don’t experiment much with lunch foods because my oldest Mason is so picky.

Dinner is when I do the most experimenting. I recently restarted my Hello Fresh subscription so that I can learn more vegetarian meals, and we go meat free 3 times a week with their veggie plan. I won’t keep the subscription going forever, but for now it’s a great way to learn new recipes and cooking skills, and having a subscription has definitely increased my interest in cooking. The rest of the week I cook with meat from a farm CSA (community supported agriculture) share. This allows us to purchase 15 lbs of pasture raised, hormone-free meat each month. I purchase my share through Liberty Delight Farms. And once a week we order takeout for dinner (my favorite night of the week).

Bedtime

Thankfully both of my children sleep through the night at this stage (I’m getting ready to start over with baby #3 so wish me luck!) but we got there by moving the kids out of our bedroom, establishing a bedtime routine, and using the cry it out method (aka sleep training) for a little while. Moving the kids out of my bedroom was vital for me. I always start off with co-sleeping before moving my kids to a bassinet or pack n play in my room. But there’s something about having me nearby that just causes my kids to wake up looking for my attention (or milk) more often. I was amazed at how much longer they started sleeping when they left my room. This is only recommended when your kids are about 6 months +.

Crying it out is a controversial method, I know some parents can’t stand to hear their little ones’ cries go unanswered and I felt the same way at first. We tried it with my son Mason when he was about 5 months old because I was still getting up multiple times a night and feeling like a zombie at work. The first night of crying it out my husband had to stop me from going to him and I felt so sad. But then when he finally fell asleep, he slept for the rest of the night! On the second night he cried for a much shorter interval before falling asleep. After a few days he barely cried at all. The time it takes to get this method to work can vary but trust me it does work. And both of my kids survived the experience and are happy and very attached to me. 

Some people are amazed at how easily they usually fall asleep at home but it’s because we’ve been doing the same bedtime routine for so long that they’re very used to what comes next. I use Honest Calming Lavender Bubble Bath to help the boys get in a sleepy mood. After bath time I read 1-2 board books that are appropriate for Myles, then take him to his bed and turn on 15 minutes of bedtime music on his Scout dog (I’ve also used a noise machine and night light in the past- the Hatch Baby Rest is amazing, but found that they do fine without it now). I rock him in my arms for 2-3 minutes then lay him down and leave. He’s usually asleep within 10 minutes without any fuss. Then I read 1-2 more advanced books for Mason and repeat the same music/rocking routine with his Scout dog. Sometimes he takes longer to fall asleep but he lays in his crib without crying until he does. Then I give myself a mental pat on the back and relax for about 30 mins before joining my husband for a Netflix show. 

I know a lot of people who co-sleep end up doing so long-term, but once my babies reached the 6 month mark having designated kid-free time every night and sleeping in my bed without them has been so beneficial to my mental health and my marriage.

Those are the most important aspects of my daily routine. I would love to hear your thoughts/tips for establishing a routine in the comments. 

 

Xo,

Courtney

Two Under Two

Two Under Two

I can’t believe my oldest son Mason will be two in just a couple of weeks! My days of having two under two are coming to an end, soon it will be two under three which sounds somewhat less daunting. Mason’s approaching birthday inspired me to write a post reflecting on what life with two littles so close in age has been like. As I mentioned before, when I was pregnant with my younger son Myles, I got a lot of negative comments about how hard life was going to become with such a close age gap. Everyone from nurses to well meaning coworkers had strong opinions about it. Now that I’ve actually experienced it for several months, here’s what I have to say about life with two under two. If you’re thinking about having children close in age one day or already expecting a close younger sibling hopefully this helps.
Things are difficult, but doable– For me, the hardest part of caring for essentially two babies is feeling tired all the time. But that’s one of the hardest parts of being a new Mom even if you have one child. Things were fairly easy for me in the beginning. As a newborn Myles slept all the time, so I felt more refreshed than I expected to, and I still had some alone time with my older child. Things got harder when Myles started waking up more often because I was so drained. It’s difficult to meet everyone’s needs when you have little energy and both children are on different schedules. I’ve had plenty of moments where I felt overwhelmed, but some strong coffee and leaning on my husband more or another family member helped me get through those tough moments. And sometimes I just have to take a break (more on that later).
Thankfully things have started to get easier again now that their schedules are syncing up and Myles is starting to sleep through the night. Getting everyone on the same schedule or close to being on the same schedule is essential for thriving with two under two! I like to change diapers back to back, bathe them at the same time, and put them to bed at the same time. Then my hubby and I can enjoy some netflix and wine or I can read a book (or let’s be honest browse social media) at the end of the day to decompress.
The older child may need some time to get used to the baby– Mason had a bit of a learning curve when it came to interacting with his younger brother. Not only was he not used to sharing me, but he also didn’t know how to gently handle someone so small and fragile and I had to watch him like a hawk around the baby. It took about three months for him to get used to Myles, and Myles is still growing on him. Now they’re even starting to play together. Myles is completely enamored with his big brother and it’s beautiful to see a budding relationship that is separate from my own relationship with them.
Self-care becomes more important than ever– When I was pregnant with Myles I once had a friend remark that I would be walking around with mismatched clothes and makeup smeared on my face after the baby because two under two would turn me into a zombie. Thankfully that’s not true. I don’t really get dressed up while I’m sitting at home with the boys, and sometimes things do get a little messy, but in general I love getting dressed in real clothes, getting my hair done, and putting makeup on. Those things actually mean more to me now with two under two, because it helps me maintain my sense of self. It’s important to prioritize yourself physically and emotionally so that you’re not pouring from an empty cup.
If I’m feeling really overwhelmed, sometimes I just hand both kids over to my hubby and go spend some time by myself. I usually come back feeling much more recharged and capable, so I don’t feel guilty about doing that. Self-care is essential for a happy household. It’s also important to make time for activities that have nothing to do with the kids. I recently started a meditation program. And my resolution for 2019 is to schedule more dates with my friends and to start doing yoga again.
That’s my take on two under two. I’d love to hear your thoughts. If you’ve experienced life with two kids close in age, please feel free to share your perspective.
Xo,
Courtney